Are Masters 1000 mandatory for top ranked players?

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Any player that is in the Top 30 in the ATP Rankings from the previous year is considered a Commitment Player for the current year.

From the 2013 ATP Official Rulebook, I. ATP Circuit Regulations, 1.07 C:

Commitment Player
A 2013 ATP commitment player is any player positioned in the Top 30 in the ATP 2012 Rankings (singles) as of November 5, 2012.

The commitment for a commitment player is described in section D. Essentially, the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals is required, if accepted; 8 of the 9 ATP World Tour Masters 1000 tournaments are required (all except Monte Carlo), and 4 of the ATP World Tour 500 tournaments are required.

1.07 D:

Commitment
The commitment for the commitment player is, the singles event of all ATP World Tour Masters 1000 tournaments for which he is accepted, the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals (if qualified as a direct acceptance or designated as the alternate) and four (4) ATP World Tour 500 tournaments,...

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Well, let's put it this way- I am an ardent advocate for the importance of 1000s.

1000s are mandatory events. Every 1000 must therefore have as difficult or nearly as difficult a draw as any slam. There will be a fewer amount of rounds and sets played, however, since a slam is best of 5 with a larger draw, and hence also spans two weeks, a week longer than the typical 1000.

Masters 1000s provide both a career title to the player that won it and valuable top 10 wins. This is typically why people claim that the fact that it is a Masters 1000 has no intrinsic value- the value is summed up in the career title and top ten wins it provides. If it doesn't provide top 10 wins, it wasn't that strong of a tournament to begin with. That reasoning is pretty good. It makes sense that the difficulty of the draw should be what determines how much a tournament is worth, and if a 250 draw (say, Doha) has a deeper draw than a 1000 (say, any of those outlined here:...

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I love the ATP Masters 1000. They’re a genius idea: you make a set number of events mandatory for the top guys, you dump a ton of money on them, and then you sit back and enjoy the fireworks.

2012 wasn’t a historically great season for the M1000s, but they still managed to influence the various storylines that defined men’s tennis this year. For example, the M1000s played a key role in Federer’s return to the No. 1 ranking. Had Federer not managed to pull out the Indian Wells and Madrid titles, his quest to pass Sampras’ record of all-time weeks at the top of the rankings would’ve surely ended in failure, even with his Wimbledon win. Nadal finally broke his seven-final losing streak to Djokovic by beating the Serb in Montecarlo, and started a streak of his own by repeating the feat in Rome and then in the French Open Final. The M1000s also provided Novak Djokovic the chance to get re-acquainted with his 2011 self when he stared down five match points in Shanghai....

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5.Andy Murray14

Doubles

Past finals

2009 finals

See main article: 2009 ATP World Tour Masters 1000.

2010 finals

See main article: 2010 ATP World Tour Masters 1000.

2011 finals

See main article: 2011 ATP World Tour Masters 1000.

2012 finals

See main article: 2012 ATP World Tour Masters 1000.

2013 finals

See main article: 2013 ATP World Tour Masters 1000.

2014 finals

See main article: 2014 ATP World Tour Masters 1000.

2015 finals

See main article: 2015 ATP World Tour Masters 1000.

2016 finals

See main article: 2016 ATP World Tour Masters 1000.

2017 finals

See main article: 2017 ATP World Tour Masters 1000.

After the Paris Masters 2016, since the 2009 changes the "big four" i.e. Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic & Andy Murray combined have won 64 out of 72 ATP Masters 1000 finals, and have a current streak of 36...

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Find out all you need to know plus info on free tennis live streams right here on livetennis.com.

After the Grand Slams and the ATP World Tour Finals, the Masters 1000 tournaments are the most prestigious in the tennis calendar. Nine events comprise the Masters 1000 series, so-called because the champion of each receives that number of ranking points.

Winning a Masters event is seen as a major step towards a Grand Slam title, as it proves that a player can beat the very best in the game on a big stage. In fact, triumphing at one of the Masters 1000 tournaments can sometimes be an even tougher task, as the competition is just as stiff but there are few rest days between matches.

The nine Masters series tournaments are, in the order they are played: Indian Wells, Miami, Monte Carlo, Madrid, Rome, Canada, Cincinnati, Shanghai and Paris. Of these, only Monte Carlo does not require mandatory commitment from the top players.

Indian Wells and Miami, both...

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The ATP Tour is about to end in November, after the Paris Open. Only then will we know whose racquet is clearly going to the Barkley’s ATP Tour Finals, which allows the top 8 players to perform an intense tournament. Throughout the year, every Monday the ATP rankings are updated and little is known about how this ranking system works and how players keep positions and how they lose points. In some cases, we see a player that gets to play a final to only see his ranking points decreasing. How weird is that? The race to London calculation, defending points based ranking, masters 100, 500, 250. All of these conform the ATP player ranking system and to better understand it from a general approach, we have created an illustrated cheat sheet to help you at home.

ATP Ranking Explained

Extra bits.

Seeded Players, are the top players who are selectively placed in a draw so that they won’t play against each other in the early rounds of a tournament. In a tennis Grand...

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The ATP Rankings, as defined by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP), are the "objective merit-based method used for determining qualification for entry and seeding in all tournaments for both singles and doubles, except as modified for the ARAG ATP World Tour Team Championship and Barclays ATP World Tour Finals (singles or doubles)."[1] The rankings period is "the immediate past 52 weeks, except for: Barclays ATP World Tour Finals, singles and doubles, which is dropped on the Monday following the last ATP World Tour event of the following year; Futures Series tournaments that are only entered into the system on the second Monday following the tournament’s week. Once entered, all tournaments, except for the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals, remain in the system for 52 consecutive weeks."[1]

A player's ATP Ranking is based on the total points he accrued in the following 19 tournaments (18 if he did not qualify for the...

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The ATP Rankings, as defined by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP), are the "objective merit-based method used for determining qualification for entry and seeding in all tournaments for both (male) singles and doubles, except as modified for the ATP World Tour Finals (singles or doubles)."[1] The rankings period is "the immediate past 52 weeks, except for: Barclays ATP World Tour Finals, singles and doubles, which is dropped on the Monday following the last ATP World Tour event of the following year; Futures Series tournaments that are only entered into the system on the second Monday following the tournament's week. Once entered, all tournaments, except the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals, remain in the system for 52 consecutive weeks."[1]

Overview

A player's ATP Ranking is based on the total points he accrued in the following 19 tournaments (18 if he did not qualify for the ATP World Tour Finals):

The requirement to play in four ATP World Tour 500...

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Weekly net post: Tennis serves up its March madness

By Joe Fleming, USA TODAY

Tennis' version of March Madness begins this week in Indian Wells, Calif.

The BNP Paribas Open is the first of two back-to-back high-powered tennis events that will draw a combined 600,000-plus fans, this week in California and March 23-April 4 in Key Biscayne, Fla., for the Sony Ericsson Open. That's more fans than the NCAA will draw for its March Madness.

Last year in Indian Wells 332,498 people attended the 12-day tournament.

The attendance figure that's even more compelling to tennis fans, however, is the number of the world's top-ranked players on the entry list. Since the tournaments are Masters 1,000 (ATP) and Premier (WTA) — and basically mandatory — most everybody will be there.

•Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, unseen since the Australian Open, make their returns. Federer already is on the courts in California after recovering from a lung infection that...

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Hey everyone,

So this month I would like to try to shoot for the top 1000 at season end but I honestly don't know how many points in ranking I would need to achieve that. Right now I'm at about 8500 but would be higher if the app would stop crashing mid match (or right before I make the killing blow......). Looking at last seasons finish, the rank 100 player had a little over 21000 but as the month goes on it looks like that will be higher for this season. I'm just wondering how much further behind the top 100 do you need to be to get into the top 1000. I would guess that for last season it would have been about 1500 but that is just my guess. If anyone knows this, let me know.

Thank...

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There are a number of different category of tournament in the ATP World Tour, with each being worth a different amount of ranking points. Some of the tournaments are self-explanatory; the 250 Series, 500 Series, and Masters 1000 grant the winner 250, 500, and 1,000 ranking points respectively. There are also the Grand Slam events which, if you’re not a tennis fan, will likely be the only tournaments you’re aware of, and they grant the winner a whopping 2,000 points.

It is not only the winner of a tournament that is awarded points, however. Points are granted to a player for simply being in the tournament, whether they got there through direct acceptance, qualifying, or as a wild card. The amount of points granted to a player increases the farther they progress into the tournament, so a player reaching the quarter finals will claim more ranking points than a player who was knocked out in the second round. Here is a complete breakdown of the points distribution among the ATP...

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Andrew Redington/Getty Images

The Masters marks the beginning of the season in the eyes of many golf fans since it's the first major of the year, but several golfers have established themselves as top contenders due to strong play in 2017 already.

Dustin Johnson is chief among them, and he enters the Masters as the odds-on favorite to capture the green jacket for the first time in his career.

He'll be met with plenty of resistance in his attempt to do so, however, with other top players such as Rory McIlroy and Jason Day looking to join the club as well.

Ahead of Thursday's opening round at Augusta National Golf Course in Georgia, here is a full rundown of Masters odds, along with predictions for how the top-ranked golfers will fare.

Dustin Johnson

Johnson finally conquered his major tournament demons last...

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The ATP rankings calculation explained

Tennis is a competitive sport. And as in any other competition, there is always the best one (World No.1), top 10, etc., and those who lag behind.

When analyzing any match to come, punters must consider the players current rankings and the progress they’ve made recently (if any).

To facilitate this analysis, ATP has provided fans, bookmakers and anyone engaged, with a very effective, but pretty complicated tool – ATP rankings.

FIRST THINGS COME FIRST: IS THERE ONLY ONE RANKING SYSTEM IN PLACE?

As a matter of fact, there are two different calculations and to take advantage over the bookies, say nothing about being more knowledgeable in modern tennis, you’d better know the difference.

Two ranking systems are applied by ATP officials: the Emirates ATP Rankings (widely known as the Rankings), and the Emirates ATP Ranking Race to London (the Race for short).

To answer these questions, let’s dig...

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How Competitions Work

Every week we will be holding various competition for all players, where top ranked players will be rewarded with cool badges that will give you powerful permanent in-game boosts.

Competitions will start at 00:00 Monday (Server Time - UTC) and end on Sunday 23:59:59, shortly after which rewards will automatically be paid out and applied to your account.

WHAT COMPETITIONS BRING TO THE GAME

With competitions we want to achieve several things:

Increase competition amongst players AND countries Give players a weekly goal to aim to and be rewarded for doing so that has an effect on your game Reward both players focused on Boot Camp and/or WarZone Make them viable and worth it for both NEW (helps players catch up with players playing for longer time) and OLD players (players working hard for a long time will be rewarded with boosts and recognition) Just make the game funner to plays due to...
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Tennis had better be careful what it wishes for. In the never ending pursuit of the sponsors’ dollar and the TV companies’ coverage, the sport is always looking to change and evolve: more demands on the top players, more tournaments, more schedules that suit the broadcast rights holders, not the players.

READ MORE - Andy Murray ‘50-50’ for US Open, says leading hip specialist

We are told that this is the golden age of tennis. To have four players of the calibre of Andy Murray, Novak Djokovic, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal competing against each other for more than a decade, to have them collect 48 grand slam trophies between them and make 82 appearances in grand slam finals (obviously, many of those finals were against each other) – that marks these four out as something special, something we are unlikely ever to see again.

Yet as Wimbledon approaches the business end of the competition, only the 35-year-old Federer is still standing. Murray is at...

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Ivan Ljubicic’s birthday typically falls during the BNP Paribas Open, his favourite tournament. He marked the occasion on court in 2008, presented with a cake from Roger Federer, the man he now coaches. This year, when he celebrates his 38th birthday on final Sunday, he’ll be hoping for another special memory courtesy of the Swiss.

Seven years earlier in Indian Wells, Ljubicic knocked off three Top 10 players – Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Andy Roddick – en route to his biggest career title, fittingly at an ATP World Tour Masters 1000 event. Over the Croatian’s prolific 15-year career, the Masters 1000 tournaments provided the stage for his breakthrough, his best tennis and his curtain call.

This week in Indian Wells, Ljubicic looked back on his many Masters 1000 highlights, including a lucky break at the 1999 Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters and “epic” Madrid final against Nadal, and shared just how tough it is to win one of these titles.

Can you share your...

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The year-end Emirates ATP Rankings is based on calculating, for each player, his total points from the four (4) Grand Slams, the eight (8) mandatory ATP World Tour Masters 1000 tournaments and the Nitto ATP Finals of the ranking period, and his best six (6) results from all ATP World Tour 500, ATP World Tour 250, ATP Challenger Tour and Futures tournaments. For every Grand Slam or mandatory ATP World Tour Masters 1000 tournament for which a player is not in the main draw, and was not (and, in the case of a Grand Slam, would not have been, had he and all other players entered) a main draw direct acceptance on the original acceptance list, and never became a main draw direct acceptance, the number of his results from all other eligible tournaments in the ranking period, that count for his ranking, is increased by one (1). In weeks where there are not four (4) Grand Slams and eight (8) ATP World Tour Masters 1000 tournaments in the ranking period, the number of a player’s best...

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The ATP Rankings are the objective merit-based method used by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) for determining the qualification for entry as well as the seeding of players in all singles and doubles tournaments.[1] The first rankings for singles were published on 23 August 1973 while the douples players were ranked for the first time on 1 March 1976. The rankings period is "the immediate past 52 weeks, except for: ATP World Tour Finals, singles and doubles, which is dropped on the Monday following the last ATP World Tour event of the following year; Futures Series tournaments that are only entered into the system on the second Monday following the tournament's week. Once entered, all tournaments, except the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals, remain in the system for 52 consecutive weeks."[1]

History

The ATP began as the men's trade union in 1972 and rose to prominence when 81 of its members boycotted the 1973 Wimbledon Championships.[2] Just two months...

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